17 of the best museums in Bronx, NYC

NOTE: All public museums are temporarily closed because of COVID-19. Check each website for individual details of each museum.

Museums can be toured at any time of the year -- that's the great thing about them! Learn something new even when it's 20 degrees in the winter or 90 degrees in the summer. Escape the temperature by walking into these museums and learn new things.

Here are our top list of museums in the Bronx:

One of the highest rated museums on Google, The Bronx Museum of the Arts has permanent and revolving exhibitions which showcase contemporary life of urban living and the borough's dynamic communities.

The museum's history began with its first major leap in 1982 when it moved into a former synagogue purchased and donated by the City of New York. In February 2004, the museum began construction on a 16,000 sq. The $19 million space opened in October 2006.

Today, it's home to over 800 paintings, sculptures, photographs, and works on paper.

2. The Museum of Bronx History (MBH) at the Valentine-Varian House

The house opened as an official museum in 1968. It is the Bronx's second oldest house and oldest remaining farmhouse. It was first constructed in 1758 by Isaac Valentine.

Today, sections of the house retain the original floorboards, hand-forged nails and homemade mortar. Two rooms contain changing exhibitions.

Mission Statement: Bronx Children’s Museum seeks to inspire children, along with their families and caregivers, to learn about themselves within the richness and diversity of their surroundings and beyond, and to become stewards of the planet.

Originally found in 2005, the museum is a place designed to inspire children and families in diversity in the Bronx. Their iconic mobile bus hosts "Waters On the Go!" every school year. Learn more about it on their website.

Mission: The Universal Hip Hop Museum in the Bronx celebrates and preserves the history of local and global hip-hop music and culture to inspire, empower, and promote understanding.

In the 20th century, City Island was a hub for boat building. Take a look at the Boat-Building History Exhibit with photos and commentary about the yatchs they created.

Their Facebook page has lots of images of old and current boats.

This estate is the last remaining 19th-century area of land in the Bronx. There is a garden and site history for those visiting. They educate visitors through public programming.

7. The Hall Of Fame For Great Americans

The outdoor hall of statue heads of prominent Americans spans in a half-circle around New York University at the University Heights campus.

Some of the sculture are Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, Washington Irving, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, and Orville and Wilbur Wright.

The home and estate make valuable connections between past and present. There are collections of old items that the family used during the time when the home was constructed.

Found in 1982 by Ralph and Leuba Baum who donated most of their Jewish collection of ceremonial art for the purpose of preserving the past and providing a vision for the futre.

It's a 5,000 square foot museum tucked away in a home for older adults at the Hebrew Home at Riverale. It's a focal point for a wide range of educational and exhibition programming for residents and visitors alike.

The Edgar Allan Poe Cottage was built in 1797 and was administered by the Bronx County Historical Society since 1975. Today, the cottage sits on the north side of Poe Park.

Fun fact: Poe used to pay either $5 per month or $100 per year for rent for the cottage.

Although not part of the Bronx (in Manhattan), it's close enough to be considered.

The museum mainly focus on the Romanesque and Gothic periods with over 5,000 works of art and architecture.

The Bronx Council on the Arts (BCA) is dedicated to advancing cultural equity in the Bronx. They provide programs for children and seniors as well as other organizations.

This humble museum is on the SUNY Maritime College campus. It houses ship artifacts and interactive and multimedia of maritime items.

 
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The museum takes you back to the 1960s and 1970s when contemporary art movements influenced the formation of Hip Hop culture. Today, it's now a multi-trillion dollar industry.

It's located in Bronx Termial Market.

Mission statement: “We want to create a healthy and nurturing space where the community comes together to learn and grow, develop and train…A place where art and culture converge, the talents and dreams of our visitors are nurtured and the possibilities unleashed.  We’re all about building vibrant, sustainable programs and projects that transform our neighborhoods!”

This house is a long-standing museum -- opening in 1916. Originally built in 1784, it was once a farm house. It's currently preserved by the New York City Department of Parks & Recreation.

17. Garabedian House

A Christmas display hosted by a home owner. Throughout the year it's lit, but around the holidays, it's an even more joyous show.

Not a "museum," but a place to see amazing views of nature. It's considered to be a "living museum," a major educational institution, and a renowned plant research and conservation organization.

Originally opened in 1891 and has been providing beautiful nature ever since.

BONUS: Nelson Avenue Graffiti Art Wall

nelson avenue graffiti wall

Not necessarily a museum, but a notorious place to see in the Bronx. Take a look at the beautiful wall art.


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